Ignore Raster Data when Converting from Vector Formats

Vector files are sometimes complex layered image structures that can contain both vector and raster data. For example, you can have a detailed scalable map made up of lines and curves also including raster representations of some map elements, such as an aerial photograph or satellite image.

When converting PDF, EPS, CDR, XPS, SVG and other vector formats with mixed raster-vector content to raster formats such as JPEG or PNG, a fair representation of colors and quality will be ensured. But when you convert to another vector format, image quality might become an issue.

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How to Rotate PLT Files During Conversion

If you are planning to print a graphics file on a plotting device, then converting it to PLT is the best option. Whether you are using a cutting plotter, a pen plotter or some other similar machine, the PLT format will ensure what you create on screen will match what you see in print.

PLTs are vector files that use the HPGL language and can be sent directly to print on a plotter. Such devices are often used for large-scale graphics such as maps, detailed plans or diagrams, posters and many more. The PLT format was originally created for Hewlett-Packard printers only, but in time became an actual standard in the industry. PLTs are currently compatible with most brands of plotting machines.

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How to Create EPS Files with Preview

EPS (Encapsulated PostScript) is a vector format used for storing images and drawings. Such files can contain maps, logos or detailed layouts and can include both vector and bitmap data. Compared to the similar PS format, EPS not only uses the PostScript language to describe graphics, but also stores an “encapsulated” preview of low-resolution, that can be displayed by some programs.

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How to Assign a New ICC Profile during Batch Image Conversion

Using ICC profiles is an absolute must when you want to do effective color management. The reason is simple: they contain all essential data needed for the correct rendering of colors.

ICC stands for International Color Consortium — an independent organization launched in 1993 by eight vendors with the aim of promoting color management systems across different platforms. The ICC profile of an image contains detailed descriptions of how its colors should be rendered, including color space and distribution, how the lightest and darkest tones are dispersed and combined throughout the image pixels etc.

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Use Page Size or Object Size during SVG Conversion

SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) is a versatile format based on the XML markup language, supporting a variety of static and moving images — drawings, animations, interactive graphics and more. Launched as an open standard at the end of the 1990s, the SVG format is currently compatible with most web browsers and can be edited using any text editor or graphics program. This is great news for developers, as they can use SVG to create various types of graphical applications.

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Disable Saving Text as Polygon during Conversion to DWG/DXF

DWG and DXF are two of the most widely used graphics formats in the construction and engineering industry. They are usually created via AutoCAD, the popular software for drafting 2D and 3D computer-aided design projects, and they store large layered files with detailed building plans, maps, model designs etc. DXF represents the interchange version of DWG and both formats are scalable vectors storing images as polygons.

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How to Create Animated SWF Files

SWF stands for “small web format” or “Shockwave Flash” and represents an animated image extension currently part of the Adobe group of proprietary formats. Together with GIF and PNG, SWF represents one of the most widely used extensions for posting online short animations or applets than can include interactive features. Some of the main advantages of using SWF include fast loading time, supporting scalable graphics and transparencies.

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Remove Duplicated Lines When Converting to PLT

The PLT (Plotter) format is the best option when you plan to print maps, detailed building plans, banners, large posters or other types of line and curve drawings in full-color. Initially launched by Hewlett Packard for its own plotter printers, the PLT extension has now become an actual standard for almost all brands of cutting plotters.

PLT files can be created using AutoCAD and a few other types of computer-aided design software, or through conversion. They contain vector images which maintain their quality when scaled to different sizes and use the HPGL language. The main advantage of PLTs over PDFs, for example, is that they are designed particularly for plotter printers, which means you can send the large-scale graphics file directly to print.

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How to Convert to GBR Using Raster to Vector Conversion

If you are involved in designing or handling printed circuit boards (PCBs), you probably come across the Gerber format frequently. Currently used as an actual standard in the PCB industry, the GBR extension is attached to files that contain images and descriptions of various board data, including layers, solder masks, electrical connections, drilling data etc.

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How to Set Pen Width during Conversion to PLT

PLT is an image format associated with plotters — a type of printing devices that use vector graphics as input files, as opposed to regular printers, which can only print raster images. Plotters can be of different kinds, including pen plotters — printing devices using a pen to draw lines and curves on paper, and cutting plotters — using knives to cut shapes into paper or other types of materials.

Files with the PLT extension usually store maps, posters, detailed designs of machines and other types of monochrome or full-colored graphics. PLTs can be created using computer-aided design software, such as AutoCAD and Adobe Illustrator. Or they can be obtained via conversion from other image formats. The main advantage of PLT over other graphics extensions is that the image can be sent directly to the plotting device.

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